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Obscure sedge shield bug - Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura

By N A Martin (2017)

Classification

Phylum:
Arthropoda
Class:
Insecta
Order:
Hemiptera
Family:
Acanthosomatidae
Scientific Name:
Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura Dallas, 1851
  • Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
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Common Names

Obscure sedge shield bug
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Biostatus and Distribution

This endemic shield bug is present in the North and South Islands of New Zealand. The Obscure sedge shield bugs are mainly found in on sedges in open areas and in forests. They feed on the leaves, stems and seeds of these plants.

Conservation status: The Obscure sedge shield bug is widespread in areas where sedges grow.

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Life Stages and Annual Cycle

Obscure sedge shield bug overwinter as adults that probably shelter between leaves at the base of plants such as sedges and in detritus at the base of such plants. In spring they mate and lay eggs. There is a single generation per year. Nymphs are present in summer and new season adults appear in mid to late summer.

Adults are 7.5-9.5 mm long and about 3 times as long as wide. The body is coloured shades of brown with a central thin white line extending from behind the head to the tip of the scutellum. The dorsal surface of the head thorax (middle part of the body) and the non-membranous part of the forewings is covered in small dark punctures. The antennae and the three pairs of legs are pale brown. The last two segments of the antennae may be dark brown. The long rostrum that holds the stylets used for feeding, is held between the legs when not used for feeding. Also on the underside is an abdominal spine that projects forward between the last pair of legs. When they mate the male and female are back to back with the male attached to the underside of the female.

The female lays batches of almost spherical eggs on green fruit or leaves of host plants. An egg batch typically has eight eggs, one for each ovariole. The surface of the egg is finely sculptured. A female lays several batches. The egg shell splits down the side during hatching.

The first instar (stage) nymphs stay be the eggs. There are five nymphal instars. Nymphs go from one stage to the next by moulting, where the “skin” on the dorsal side splits and the next stage pulls itself out. They look like wingless adults. They are usually shades of brown with white areas, though some smaller nymphs can be very green. The head and thorax have a central pale line which extends into the abdomen. The area around the scent glands is dark brown and larger nymphs have a pair of white lateral bands on the abdomen. The antennae are pale brown with a mainly black terminal segment. In the fifth instar the penultimate antennal segment is also mainly black. The legs are pale brown. On the fourth and fifth instar nymphs wing buds can be seen. The wing buds on the fifth instar extend onto the abdomen.

A New Zealand entomologist, JG Pendergrast developed a method for rearing t the Linear sedge shield bug. His 1952 paper reports that the developmental time from egg to adult is about 56 days: egg 7-9 days, 1st instar 8-10, 2nd instar 8-10, 3rd instar 9-10, 4th instar 9-12, 5th instar 10-18. The developmental times for the Obscure sedge shield bug are likely to be similar.

Walking and flying
The nymphs and adults have six legs (three pairs) that are used for walking. The adults have two pairs of wings. The front pair is modified as covers for the hind wings.

Feeding
Like other Hemiptera, the Obscure sedge shield bug has sucking mouth parts. The long stylets, special shaped rods, are held in the rostrum. The Obscure sedge shield bugs feed on leaves and seeds of sedges. During feeding the stylets are inserted into the plant. The mandibles hold the rostrum in place. The maxillae are inserted into the plant. They form two tubes, a narrow duct down which saliva is pumped into the plant, and a larger tube up which the partly digested food is sucked.

  • Drawing of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 5.
    Drawing of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 5.
  • Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Underside of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the external genitalia.  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Underside of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the external genitalia. Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Underside of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the external genitalia.  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Underside of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the external genitalia. Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Side view of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the external genitalia.  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Side view of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the external genitalia. Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • A mating pair of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    A mating pair of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Underside of a mating pair of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Underside of a mating pair of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Side view of a mating pair of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Side view of a mating pair of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Eggs of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): the eggs have a faint ring of sculpturing at one end.  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Eggs of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): the eggs have a faint ring of sculpturing at one end. Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Green eggs of a shield bug (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Green eggs of a shield bug (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Eggs and a recently hatched nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Eggs and a recently hatched nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Second instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on seeds of Swamp sedge, Carex virgate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Second instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on seeds of Swamp sedge, Carex virgate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Third instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Third instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Recently moulted third instar Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Recently moulted third instar Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fully grown third instar Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fully grown third instar Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Both sides of a fully grown third instar Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Both sides of a fully grown third instar Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fourth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on seeds of Swamp sedge, Carex virgate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fourth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on seeds of Swamp sedge, Carex virgate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fourth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fourth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fourth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on leaves of Giant umbrella sedge, Cyperus ustulatus (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fourth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on leaves of Giant umbrella sedge, Cyperus ustulatus (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Underside of a fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Underside of a fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Underside of a fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Underside of a fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Two fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on a leaf of Niggerhead sedge, Carex secta (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Two fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on a leaf of Niggerhead sedge, Carex secta (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
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Fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Niggerhead sedge, Carex secta (Cyperaceae).
 Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Niggerhead sedge, Carex secta (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Moulted nymphal skins of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) in a seed head of Giant umbrella sedge, Cyperus ustulatus (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Moulted nymphal skins of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) in a seed head of Giant umbrella sedge, Cyperus ustulatus (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
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Recognition

Both the adults and nymphs of the Obscure sedge shield bug and the Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris are similar in appearance, but live individuals can be identified.

Adults
Adults of both species are about 7.5-9.5 mm long. The Obscure sedge shield bugs are about 3 times as long as wide, while adult Linear sedge shield bugs are broader, about 2.5 times as long as wide. They are similarly coloured. The best distinguishing character is the width of the central white line on the mesonotum and scutellum. On the Obscure sedge shield bug the line is narrow and sometimes indistinct with black punctures almost covering the line. It is wider and whiter in the Linear sedge shield bug.

Nymphs
The nymphs of Obscure sedge shield bugs are hairless and the dark brown oval areas on the third abdominal segment are invaginated on the inner margin. These brown areas lack a lateral pale spot.
The nymphs of Linear sedge shield bug are covered in a fine pubescence, though it is not easy to see on live insects. The best character is the pair of dark brown oval areas on the third abdominal segment. They are rounded on their inner edge and have a pale spot near their lateral edge.

  • Drawing of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 5.
    Drawing of an adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 5.
  • Drawing of an adult Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 6.
    Drawing of an adult Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 6.
  • Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • A mating pair of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    A mating pair of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Adult Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Adult Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • A mating pair of Linear sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    A mating pair of Linear sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Drawing of a fifth instar nymph of the Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the pale invagination internal edge of the dark oval area on the 3rd abdominal segment (arrow). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 22.
    Drawing of a fifth instar nymph of the Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the pale invagination internal edge of the dark oval area on the 3rd abdominal segment (arrow). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 22.
  • Drawing of a fifth instar nymph of the Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the clear spot in the dark oval area on the 3rd abdominal segment (arrow). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 23.
    Drawing of a fifth instar nymph of the Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae): note the clear spot in the dark oval area on the 3rd abdominal segment (arrow). Image: Des Helmore © Drawing published in Fauna of New Zealand volume 35, figure 23.
  • Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fifth instar nymph of Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae).  Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar nymph of Linear sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) lineolaris (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
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Natural Enemies

One parasitoid is known, though Obscure sedge shield bugs may also be eaten by birds and predatory insects.

Parasitoid
The egg parasite, Trissolcus maori Johnson, 1991 (Hymenoptera: Platygasteridae) is known on this shield bug and the two other shield bugs in the family Acanthosomatidae.

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Host Plants

The adults and nymphs feed on the developing seeds and leaves of sedges. Adults may also feed on ripe seeds, especially during winter.

Feeding
Like other Hemiptera, the Obscure sedge shield bug has sucking mouth parts. The long stylets, special shaped rods, are held in the rostrum. During feeding the stylets are inserted into the plant. The mandibles hold the rostrum in place. The maxillae are inserted into the plant. They form two tubes, a narrow duct down which saliva is pumped into the plant, and a larger tube up which the partly digested food is sucked.

Table: Host plants of the Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) from Plant-SyNZ database (26 October 2017). The reliability score shows the quality of evidence for the host association (1-10, 10=high).
Common Name(s)Scientific NameFamilyReliability IndexBiostatus
Marsh clubrush, Kōpūngāwhā, Kōpūpūngāwhā, Kukuraho, RīrīwakaBolboschoenus fluviatilis (Torr.) SojákCyperaceae10indigenous, non-endemic
 Carex aff geminataCyperaceae10endemic
Rautahi, Toetoe rautahiCarex lessoniana Streud.Cyperaceae10endemic
Niggerhead, Makura, Mārū, Mātā, Mātātā, Pūkio, Pūrei, Pūreirei, PūrekirekiCarex secta BoottCyperaceae10endemic
Swamp sedgeCarex virgata Sol. ex BoottCyperaceae10endemic
Umbrella sedge, PuketangataCyperus eragrostis Lam.Cyperaceae10naturalised
Coastal cutty grass, Cyperus, Giant umbrella sedge, Toetoe, Toetoe upokotangata, Toetoe whatu-manu, Toetoe whatu-pākau, UpokotangataCyperus ustulatus A.Rich.Cyperaceae10endemic
  • Second instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on seeds of Swamp sedge, Carex virgate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Second instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on seeds of Swamp sedge, Carex virgate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Recently moulted third instar Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Recently moulted third instar Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fourth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fourth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) on Carex aff geminate (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  •    
Fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Niggerhead sedge, Carex secta (Cyperaceae).
 Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Niggerhead sedge, Carex secta (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Nymphs of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) in a seed head of Giant umbrella sedge, Cyperus ustulatus (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Nymphs of Obscure sedge shield bugs, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) in a seed head of Giant umbrella sedge, Cyperus ustulatus (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
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Information Sources

Lariviere M-C. 1995. Cydnidae, Acanthosomatidae, and Pentatomidae (insecta: Heteroptera): systematics, geographical distribution, and bioecology. Fauna of New Zealand. 35: 1-107.

Lariviere M-C, Larochelle A. 2004. Heteroptera (Insecta: Hemiptera): catalogue. Fauna of New Zealand. 50: 1-330.

Pendergrast JG. 1952. Studies on the biology of pentatomid bugs of the genus Rhopalimorpha Dallas (Heteroptera). Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand 80(2): 143-153.

Pendergrast JG. 1960. Nymphs of the genus Rhopalimorpha Dallas (Hemiptera, Acanthosomidae). Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand 88(1): 141-147.


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Acknowledgements

The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited (Plant & Food Research) for permission to use photographs.

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Other Images

  • Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Tim Holmes © Plant & Food Research
    Adult Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Tim Holmes © Plant & Food Research
  • Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Underside of a fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Underside of a fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fourth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fourth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fifth instar nymph of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Underside of an adult male Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Underside of an adult male Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
  • Fourth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Niggerhead sedge, Carex secta (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
    Fourth instar of Obscure sedge shield bug, Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura (Hemiptera: Acanthosomatidae) feeding on seeds of Niggerhead sedge, Carex secta (Cyperaceae). Image: Nicholas A. Martin © Plant & Food Research
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Suggested Citation

Martin NA. 2017. Obscure sedge shield bug - Rhopalimorpha (Rhopalimorpha) obscura. Interesting Insects and other Invertebrates. New Zealand Arthropod Factsheet Series Number 114. http://nzacfactsheets.landcareresearch.co.nz/Index.html. Date Accessed. ISSN 1179-643X.

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